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WRT 101 - Downtown (Dorsey) Writing I: Assignments

Proposal Argument Assignment

1) Assignment 1: Proposal Argument - WalMart

For this assignment, you will write an essay as a spokesperson for Wal-Mart.  Your goal is to convince the Austin City Council to allow Wal-Mart to build a Supercenter.  Consider property taxes, state sales taxes, employment, price reductions, etc.

Suggested resources:

  • Wal-Mart website
  • Company profiles
  • Encyclopedia articles
  • Newspaper articles

Suggested keywords:

  • Wal-Mart, WalMart - try it with and without the hypen
  • Property tax
  • Sales tax
  • Employment, job creation
  • Costs
  • Revenue

2) Assignment 2: Proposal Argument - Northcross

For this assignment, you will write an essay as a spokesperson for Responsible Growth for Northcross.  Your goal is to convince the Austin City Council to DENY Wal-Mart permission to build a Supercenter.  Consider impacts to small business owners, noise pollution, loss of small town life, traffic issues, increased road repairs, etc.

Suggested resources:

  • Wal-Mart website
  • Company profiles
  • Encyclopedia articles
  • Newspaper articles

Suggested keywords:

  • Wal-Mart, WalMart - try it with and without the hypen
  • Supercenters, "big box" retailers
  • Property tax
  • Sales tax
  • Employment
  • Small businesses, "mom and pop"
  • Environmental impacts, pollution

Annotated Bibliography

Definition: An annotated bibliography is an alphabetical list of sources, cited in a uniform and proper citation format, and followed by an annotation.

Annotation: An annotation is an analytical paragraph of approximately 100-200 words, or three to six sentences. It explains the main purpose and scope of the source, briefly describes format and content, and may also cover the author’s argument as well as his/her academic credentials. It may address the intended audience of the source, and its value and significance to the field of study. The limitations or bias of the source may be addressed along with the writer’s reaction to the source. It may also evaluate the research used in the source as well as the reliability of the source.

How is this different from an abstract? An abstract is a paragraph that describes or summarizes the contents of a source.  An annotation contains some description, but it is also a critical analysis of the source.

How-to Guides:

 

Example Entry:

Poniatowska, Elena. Las soldaderas: women of the Mexican Revolution.El Paso: Cinco Punto Press, 2006.  Print.

Elena Poniatowska’s lyrical narrative accompanies a selection of photographs from the Casasola collection, taken in Mexico 1910-1921 of the soldaderas, the women who accompanied the Mexican soldiers during the Mexican Revolution. Little is known about these women, of whom Poniatowska says: “Without the soldaderas, there is no Mexican Revolution…” This is the first time the public has seen the photographs in this collection, documenting the Mexican Revolution. This selection of historic photos with Poniatowska’s narrative fills a niche where there is currently little comparable scholarship.

 

Related Videos

Here is a video about WalMart from the Library's Films on Demand database. 

Make it full screen by clicking the icon in the bottom right corner of the movie.

MLA Citation:
Independent America: The Two-Lane Search for Mom and Pop. Films Media Group, 2006. Films On Demand. Web. 25 May 2011. <http://0-digital.films.com.library2.pima.edu/PortalPlaylists.aspx?aid=1764&xtid=40685>.